Call for panel and paper proposals: Political Sociology – Contemporary Challenges (ECPR General Conference 2018)

The section Political Sociology – Contempory Challenges has been accepted for the ECPR General Conference at Hamburg Universität, August 22-25, 2018.

Section chairs: David Swartz (Boston University), Niilo Kauppi (University of Jyväskylä)

Abstract: At the dawn of the twenty-first century there were signs of a new political sociology emerging that would broaden the focus beyond classical concerns such as the social basis of political participation, voting and political parties, anti-democratic right-wing and left-wing extremism and bureaucratization, elite domination, and the modern state. Attention was shifting to historical change at a global scale (globalization). Culture (language, symbols, religion, the media) was coming to be seen as central to the exercise of power. New linkages among global, society-wide organizations and group levels were being thought about. The formation of social identity and new social movements became key concerns. And data and methodologies integrating structure with agency became the order of the day. Now is a good time to assess how those shifts in attention are working out in light of contemporary challenges such as migration, regional conflict, populism, citizenship, transnational organizations, and particularly those phenomena that challenge established institutions and state-centered analyses. This Section will invite Panel proposals that take up contemporary challenges to the new political sociology.

The Academic Convenors have provisionally allocated the Section 7 Panels. Panels (with 4-5 Papers) and individual Papers can be submitted as of now. The following links are available:

Click here to propose a Panel with Papers (login with your MyECPR account)

Click here to propose an individual Paper (login with your MyECPR account)

Please note, if you included Panels in your Section proposal, these will need to be submitted formally via MyECPR using the links provided above.

The deadline for Panel and Paper proposals is midnight UK time on 15 February 2018. However, Niilo and I are asking that you submit everything by February 1 so that we can review all submissions and have time to adjust panels and papers and request an additional panel if the number of paper submissions warrant it.

Thanks,

David L. Swartz

 

Call for papers: Public Utility, Tax Expenditures and the Welfare State (ECPR General Conference 2018)

ECPR General Conference, Hamburg, August 22-25, 2018

Section chairs: Romain Carnac (Universit of Lausanne), romain.carnac@unil.ch; Alexandre Lambelet (University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland) alexandre.lambelet@eesp.ch

Questions of public utility, and the role of private actors in promoting the public interest are intimately linked to changing conceptions of the role of the state in society. Over the past decades, neoliberal ideology and policies have questioned the scale of the welfare state; political, economic and financial crises have further eroded state capacity and social policies. And most European countries have experienced over the past decades a number of reforms questioning in different ways the role of the state, its domains of action, and the division of tasks between public and private actors.

Tax policies and fiscal tools are crucial in regard to this question (Reich 2010). Studying fiscal welfare (Morel, Touzet and Zemmour 2016) or the « Hidden Welfare State » (Howard 1993), and more specifically the political debates on the question of public utility recognition and on tax legislations related to the involvement of private fortunes or organizations in social policies, is a way to analyse the transformations of the welfare state (or welfare mix) in western countries. What kind of fiscal tools are promoted as a way to encourage third sector development or private investment in welfare policies? If there is a need of a « public utility recognition » by some authorities to enjoy a tax exemption, what are the conditions under which tax exempt status is granted and how have they evolved during the last decades? How are public authorities involved in these topics?

In order to start a dialogue between researchers from different disciplines working on a variety of national contexts, we are looking in particular for: 1) Theoretical and methodological contributions addressing the ways tax expenditures are applied in contemporary welfare states, their evolution over time or the comparison between different national contexts and different sectors of activity. 2) Empirical analyses of the ways the notion of « tax expenditures for public utilities » is applied in different sectors of activity. Contributions could in particular speak to one of the following three axes (but other aspects and panel contributions are possible too):

1) Fiscal policy debates and the welfare state: Since the 1990s, all European countries have embarked on a series of reforms to promote philanthropy. Using a political sociology perspective, with a special attention for the role of politics and ideas in shaping the reform process, this axis asks questions such as: What are the policy debates with regard to philanthropy and fiscal expenditures? Who intervenes in these debates? How does the conception of what public utility is evolve? What is the legitimacy of different fiscal tools? And what do these debates tell us on the welfare mix and his evolutions in different countries? What is the role of international contexts and debates (for instance, competition to welcome large non profit organizations).

2) Inquiring fiscal policy at the « street-level »: The Street-level bureaucracy perspective (Lipsky 2010) has shown the importance of lower-level administrators in public policy implementation, but has rarely been used in regard with fiscal policies. This axis addresses this level of analysis and questions the role of administrators in fiscal policy decision-making. What are the dilemmas the front-line workers in public services (for exemple: fiscal autorities employees) have to deal with? How do fiscal administrations’ employees enact public policy in their routine work? What are the systematic and practical dilemmas these employees must overcome? What are the methodological difficulties for studying tax policy at this level, and how to overcome research barriers?

3) Tax expenditures as public policy instruments: In a socio-economic perspective, we would like to analyse reform processes of the welfare states through the development of specific policy instruments, namely tax expenditures for public utility purposes, which remained a blind spot in much of the welfare state literature. What are the consequences of the use of this kind of techniques or policy instruments to attain social goals on the welfare state? How do these transformations in the fiscal system shape the welfare state?

Papers and/or panel proposals must be submitted through the MyECPR platform by February 15, 2018.

https://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=115

 

Click here to download the pdf of this call for papers.

 

Lipsky M. (2010). Dilemmas of the individual in public services. In: Lipsky M, editor. Street-level bureaucracy. Dilemmas of the Individual in Public Services. 2nd edn. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation; 2010.

Reich, R. (2010). Toward a political theory of philanthropy. Giving well: The ethics of philanthropy, 177–95.

Morel N., Touzet C., Zemmour M., 2016. Fiscal Welfare and Welfare State Reform: A Research Agenda. LIEPP Working Paper, 45.

Howard, Christopher (1993). « The Hidden Side of the American Welfare State », Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 108, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 403-436

Call for papers: « 1968-2018, fifty years after: where is the social movements field going? »

Conference organized by COSMOS/SNS, ECPR/SG P&M, ESA/RN25

At Scuola Normale Superiore, Florence, Italy

23-25 of May 2018

 

2018 will mark the anniversary of the 1968 social movements mobilization: from Frenc May, over Anti-Vietnam War protests or the Tlatelolco massacre, to Prague Spring. The 1968 protest cycle considerably shaped social movements, political parties, universities, states, and societies as well as the social movement scholarship. Taking the 1968 anniversary as a stimulating moment for reflection, this conference seeks to provide space for looking at the implications of that period on social movement research as well as addressing a number of key questions in current social movement research. For instance: How have the theoretical and methodological approaches in the social movements field evolved in the aftermath of 1968? How did issues of protest change: which have emerged, disappeared of taken new forms? What is the impact of protest? When do movements bring social change? How do social movements select their strategies? How do they interact with other actors like parties, interest groups or NGO’s? Where do protestors end up in the aftermath of mobilization? What is the role of memory in social movements mobilization? What is the impact of individualisation on contentious politics? What is the role of media coverage and new communication technologies?

We invite submissions from a variety of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives and using a variety of methodologies. The midterm conference aims to bring together distinguished scholars and younger researchers not only from sociology and political science, but also from related disciplines, including economics, geography, anthropology, psychology, history, international relations, and area studies.

To submit an abstract, please email an abstract of no more than 250 words to fiftyyearsafter68@gmail.com.

The deadline for all abstract submissions is the 8th of January 2018.

 

Applicants will be informed of the outcome by email no later than the 29th of January, 2018. Those offered places must confirm their participation within 10 days, after which places maybe offered to applicants on the reserve list. Participants to the Conference are required to write and submit a max. 7000-8000-word paper no later than 1st of May 2018, papers should be sent to fiftyyearsafter68@gmail.com. Oral presentations should not last more than 10 minutes. Discussants are given 5 minutes per paper.

The conference will open with a mentoring session for young scholars. Young scholars (doctoral and postdoctoral level) will be invited to submit research proposals of up to five pages upon which they would wish to receive feedback. To apply for the mentoring session, send an abstract (250 words including “mentoring session” in the title) to fiftyyearsafter68@gmail.com no later than 8th January 2018. Research proposals should be then sent to fiftyyearsafter68@gmail.com, no later than 1st of May 2018. They will be coupled with two senior scholars who are specialized in the proposal’s subject, and who will read the proposal. The young scholar will get 30 minutes with each senior scholar to receive feedback and to get to know their more senior colleagues.

 

The conference will feature keynote speeches from:

-Professor Donatella Della Porta, COSMOS, Scuola Normale Superiore

-Professor Olivier Fiellieule, University of Lausanne

-Professor Marco Giugni, University of Geneva

-Professor Béla Greskovits, Central European University

-Professor James Jasper, City University of New York

-Professor Hanspeter Kriesi, European University Institute

-Professor Michele Micheletti, Stockholm University

-Professor Eva Anduiza, Autonomous University of Barcelona

 

A roundtable will be organized discussing a book:

– Roggeband, Conny and Klandermans, Bert, eds. 2017. Handbook of Social Movements Across Disciplines. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Springer.

 

The Conference has no fees and will provide a dinner.

With best regards,

Lorenzo Bosi (SNS, COSMOS), Joost de Moor (Keele University) and Kateřina Vráblíková (OSU)

Call for papers: 4th TRACE Symposium « Parliaments and the Politicization of the EU »

4th TRACE Symposium

www.jyu.fi/trace

May 31st-June 1st, 2018

University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Abstracts due: April 1st, 2018

 

Parliaments and the Politicization of the EU

EU scholarship has tended to underplay the role of national and European parliaments in European politics. Specialists in parliamentary studies have largely missed the politicizing novelty of European integration. It is time to rethink parliaments in the EU from the perspective of politicization.

From the beginning, European integration included a parliamentary assembly and national parliaments played crucial roles. The failure of the European Political Community in 1953 was due to a decision of the French parliament, and for many years the German Bundestag was a crucial player when it came to furthering European integration. Parliamentary representation, debate and control of government and administration politicized questions that belonged to governmental prerogatives, opening up political controversies on new issues. An example in point is the parliamentary control of the election and dismissal of the European Commission. Parliaments are arenas for debating and legitimizing future integration steps. More than a system of government, parliamentary politics is a modus operandi according to which a proper understanding of a political issue requires debate with opposing views. Parliaments are arenas of debate, sites of political representation, and actors in EU politics.

Since the 1990s, the competencies of parliaments have formally increased. The European Parliament is today the first chamber of legislation in the EU. The range of European public policies and parliamentary involvement have expanded. To counter the Commission and the Council, the European Parliament has used its powers to represent European citizens and to provide a forum for Europe-wide political debates. Extreme political movements and parties have seized the EU as a central element in their political programmes and in their parliamentary activities. The Lisbon Treaty formally strengthened the role of national parliaments and opened up the way for inter-parliamentary cooperation with the European Parliament. Despite these developments, the law-making competencies of national parliaments have been limited by the fact that a considerable number of laws have been and still are decided at the EU level.

This symposium invites empirical and theoretical papers that explore the relationships between the changing role of parliaments and processes of politicization in European integration. Can parliamentarism be a response to entrenched euroskepticism? Would an increased parliamentarization of the EU lead to growing politicization and democratization? How could a parliamentarization of the EU be realized?

 

Keynotes: Simona Piattoni (University of Trento) and Olivier Rozenberg (Sciences Po Paris).

 

Please send abstracts to Niilo.t.j.kauppi@jyu.fi before April 1st. Decisions will be made mid-April. A limited amount of funds to cover travel expenses will be available for graduate students.

Call for Applications: Summer School on « Identifications and Solidarity in Europe »

Summer school of the research network « Horizontal Europeanization » at the Willy Brandt Center for German and European Studies, University of Wrocław, Poland, 21 – 24 June 2017

What is the summer school about?

The identification with Europe and a cosmopolitan identity have been hotly debated for decades. However, only now, with the rise of populist and nationalist movements all over Europe, the importance of the citizens’ support for the European integration process for the future of the European Union has become widely visible. At least since the Eurozone crisis and the related austerity policies, the time of an unquestioned “permissive consensus” of the European population is over because the political, economic and monetary integration has contributed to increasing inequalities in income, employment and social conditions as demonstrated by the obscenely high levels of youth unemployment in some Southern European countries. This has contributed to a politicization of European social integration, in particular the politicization of (1) the identification of European population with the EU, (2) the transnational solidarity among European member states, and (3) the transnational perception of social inequalities.

The aim of the summer school is to analyze and discuss how the current developments have influenced and changed the different facets of European social integration in its three dimensions. Some questions that could be addressed are: How did European, national and regional identifications develop during the crisis? Did growing social inequality in Europe contribute to the erosion of trust in the EU and the re-nationalization of collective identifications? Or did the Europe-wide coverage of the growing social problems in some countries strengthen the solidarity among European populations? A wide range of topics around the issues of identification in Europe, solidarity in Europe, and perception of social inequality in Europe are possible. During the summer school, we want to discuss these issues with a group of young scholars and more experienced researchers from various countries.

Why visit this summer school

The summer school is an extraordinary opportunity to promote your academic work. It offers the opportunity to discuss your own work with other PhD students or fresh PhDs and with experienced researchers in the field from all over Europe. You can present your assumptions and research design in front of a diverse audience and profit from remarks beyond the usual perspectives of your home institution. Additionally, senior researchers will present own published work. You have the seldom opportunity to discuss publications with the authors themselves. They not only defend their work in a Q&A but also tell the story behind the publication, how they came up with the idea and which steps the piece had to pass until publication. This allows not only a deeper understanding of the publications themselves but also gives first hand insights in the work of academic publication. Currently confirmed are Soetkin Verhaegen (University of Stockholm) and Nora Siklodi (University of Portsmouth). The event takes place in Wrocław, the 2016 capital of culture in Europe. You will experience a vibrant city but also learn about its present and past, with fundamental nationality and identity changes which mirror European history in a nutshell.

The summer school is organized and funded by the German Research Foundation and the Austrian Science Fund research network “Horizontal Europeanization” and the Willy Brandt Center for German and European Studies in cooperation with the ECPR Standing group “Identity” and the Section “Sociology of Europe (Europasoziologie)” of the German Sociological Association (DGS). Organizers are Pawel Karolewski, Jenny Preunkert and Jochen Roose.

Key information

  • Start 21 June 2017, 17:00 h, end 24 June 2017, 14:00 h
  • Presentations by young scholars of their own work
  • Presentations by experienced researchers of their own work
  • Guided city tour through Wrocław
  • Ample discussions and networking
  • No fees
  • 15 young researchers as participants
  • Seven full financed grants available (awarded depending on the quality of application and the funding needed)
  • Estimated accommodation cost (for participants without grant): 300,-EUR plus travel

Application

For an application please send:

  • description of your project (max. 800 words)
  • letter of motivation (max. 500 words)
  • indication of the funding needed

to roose@wbz.uni.wroc.pl

Deadline for applications: 30 April 2017 (information on acceptance: 10 May 2017)

For more information, please visit: http://horizontal-europeanization.eu/en/

 

Call for papers – Between Market, State and Religion: Economic Realities, Social Justice and Faith Traditions

3th UCSIA summer school on « Religion, Culture and Society: Entanglement and Confrontation »

27 Aug-2 Sept 2017, Antwerp, Belgium

Call for applications

It is the aim of the interdisciplinary UCSIA summer school to investigate the dynamic interaction between macro-level developments and bottom-up approaches in the fields of religion and culture and the way in which this interplay may induce innovative synergies and/or provoke new and old forms of confrontation.

This year, the central aim of the UCSIA summer school is to reflect upon the evolutions of economic markets interacting with specific political and socio-religious contexts through time and space. Focus is put upon the ways in which socio-economic evolutions such as globalization, the historical rise of capitalist economies and the idea of the self-regulating market interact with and affect socio-religious and cultural normative frameworks on both the level of governmental policy, economic stakeholders and the individual household. The present call invites paper proposals in which the broad topic of economic realities interacting with social contexts and faith traditions will be discussed from a diverse lines of approach, clustered around following subthemes:

  • Globalization, economic imperialism and social justice
  • Religious communities and economic values and production
  • Capitalism under construction: appropriation of capitalist producing and consuming

Guest lecturers are Prof. Dr. Jennifer Olmsted (Drew University, U.S.A; U.S. Department of Agriculture), Prof. Dr. Mayfair Yang (Department of Religious Studies and Department of East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara), Dr. David Henig (School of Anthropology & Conservation, University of Kent, UK) and Prof. Dr. Paul Oslington (Alphacrusis College, Sydney, Australia)

Practical details

Participation and stay for young scholars and researchers are free of charge. Participants should pay for their own travel expenses to Antwerp.

You can submit your application via the electronic submission on the summer school website. The completed file as well as all other required application documents must be submitted to the UCSIA Selection Committee not later than Sunday May 14th 2017.

For further information regarding the program and application procedure, please have a look at our website: http://www.ucsia.org/summerschool.

Contact

Ellen Decraene
Project Manager
UCSIA
Prinsstraat 14
2000 Antwerp – Belgium
Tel: +32/3/265.45.99
Fax: +32/3/707.09.31

Call for Papers: Political and Social Trust – Citizens and Context

Conference to be held in Tampere, Finland, on May 10-11, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Consortium of Trust Research (CONTRE) at University of Tampere and Åbo Akademi University, Finland, has the pleasure of inviting paper proposals to an international conference.

The conference brings together scholars who study the causes and consequences of social and political trust at different levels of society. It consists of keynote addresses by Professor Jonas Linde (University of Bergen) and Professor Eric M. Uslaner (University of Maryland) as well as four thematic panels.

The conference is organized as a part of the activities of the Academy of Finland funded project the Consortium of Trust Research – Pathways to Political Trust (CONTRE), in operation since September 2015. The key objective of the project is to understand to what extent short-term factors explain fluctuations in political trust and whether long-term cumulative forces explain gradual change.

HOW TO PROPOSE A PAPER

  • Participants should apply by proposing a paper related to the general theme of the conference. Participants can indicate their panel preferences in their submission.
  • Applications should include an abstract of no more than 250 words describing the proposed paper.
  • The deadline for paper proposals is February 22, 2017.
  • Propose your paper here: https://www.lyyti.in/politicalandsocialtrust_callforpapers

CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION

  • Panel chairs will select the papers to be presented at the conference. Those who have proposed papers will be informed about the selection by the end of February 2017.
  • The deadline for registration is March 31, 2017. Link to the registration form will be sent to participants via email.
  • The deadline for full papers is May 1, 2017.
  • There will be no conference fee. The local organizers will cover accommodation costs for two nights as well as lunches and dinners during their stay.

PANEL ABSTRACTS

Panel I The relevance of Social Capital

Chair: Maria Bäck, University of Tampere

The last two decades have seen an upsurge in research on the relevance of social capital in society. Social capital has been claimed to have both a private and a public dimension and it can thus be treated as either an individual-level or an aggregate-level trait. This is the also case when studying the link between social capital and political trust. There has been a large debate on the questions of whether political trust is a cause or consequence of social trust. The relevance of social capital has also been a recent topic of interest in research concerning immigration, multiculturalism and questions of community cohesion. The panel invites papers that scrutinize various aspects of social capital and the causal mechanisms through which it works in society. Papers that propose social capital as a public policy tool, e.g. to achieve social cohesion, are also welcome.

Panel II Contextual factors

Chair: Peter Söderlund, Åbo Akademi University

This panel focuses on the questions of if, how and why the context matters for citizens’ levels of political trust. Contextual factors capture variations in the wider cultural, social, economic, political and institutional context. A variety of contextual factors have been shown to explain cross-national differences in political trust, such as the longevity of democratic rule, cultural homogeneity, aggregate social trust, socioeconomic development, economic performance, political corruption, and power-sharing institutions. We welcome papers that address the mechanisms by which contextual factors, measured at an aggregate level, affect individual attitudes. For example, some environments can be conducive for trust to develop and remain stable over time, while others can be characterized by low trust and short-time fluctuations. As data accumulate over time, more comprehensive cross-sectional or longitudinal analyses are possible to test or refine contextual theories of political trust. Furthermore, contextual effects can be contingent in the sense that particular subsets of citizens develop higher (or lower) trust under certain circumstances. An interesting avenue for research is how and why trust levels vary across various social groups depending on context.

Panel III Political actors

Chair: Elina Kestilä-Kekkonen, University of Tampere

The panel focuses on the relationship between citizens’ political trust and decisions taken by the political elite. It invites both theoretical and empirical papers dealing especially with one of three themes: 1) Economy: How is political trust linked to the economic management of incumbents and consumer confidence? 2) Issue representation: Does opinion congruence between representatives and citizens affect the level of political trust? 3) Anti-incumbency and anti-establishment voting: To what extent is distrust in political actors channeled through the anti-political-establishment vote in Europe, compared to alternate expressions of dissatisfaction, i.e. anti-incumbency voting and abstention?

Panel IV Citizens

Chair: Kim Strandberg, Åbo Akademi University

Variations in short-term trust are often argued to take place due to the occurrence of political scandals or crises of various kinds. Repeated short-term trends in political trust are additionally argued to accumulate and eventually become long-term trends. It is thus crucial to gain more knowledge on the micro-level mechanisms leading to either a decrease or increase in citizens’ short-term political trust. This panel explores the mechanisms shaping citizens’ political trust in the short-term. The panel especially welcomes contributions on how experimental methods can be used to assess such fluctuations in political trust and their causes. Both theoretical and empirical pieces concerning citizens’ political trust are welcome.

CONTACT

Aino Tiihonen
Email: aino.tiihonen(a)uta.fi
Tel: +358 50 318 7649
Address: School of Management (JKK)
FI-33014 UNIVERSITY OF TAMPERE

Josefina Sipinen
Email: josefina.sipinen(a)uta.fi
Tel: +358 50 318 7681
Address: School of Management (JKK)
FI-33014 UNIVERSITY OF TAMPERE

Call for papers for the conference on Democracy and Participation (Lisbon, 12-15 July 2017)

Please find below the call for papers for the conference on Democracy and Participation in the 21st Century organised at the University of Lisbon 12-15 July 2017 (http://pascal.iseg.utl.pt/~socius/eventos/ISA-RC10/index.shtml). In order to send an abstract, please contact the session organisers via email before the 12 March 2017.

Session 6.4. Mandate type, participation as democratisation or deliberation as a limit?

Session Organized by: Cristiano Gianolla, Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal; cgianolla@gmail.com and Ryan Jepson, University of Vienna, Austria; ryan.jepson@uni.vie.ac

Imperative mandates are generally considered contrary to the spirit of liberal representative democracy in which elected representatives must be free to speak and make decisions in the best interest of the whole political community, as opposed to a specific section of society. This session aims to engage with research on the relationship between mandate type (free or imperative) and the implications for participation, deliberation, political patronage, populism and other consequences for the political system. Is it possible to consider that a free mandate expands the distance between the representative and the represented, thereby contributing to the political crisis experienced by liberal democratic regimes? How do people perceive and react to the decision of elected representatives to share their ‘mandate freedom’ with the community, adopting participatory exercises to enable the co-creation and negotiation of political decisions within political constituencies or the electorate? The session especially welcomes papers from political science and sociology researchers in order to investigate the relationship between the mandate, the political system and the political commitment of the political community. Papers may address one or more of the following or similar topics:

  • Implications of mandate type in the level of political participation;
  • Relation between mandate type and political patronage;
  • Relation between mandate type and the commons;
  • Relation between mandate type and political responsibility;
  • Implications of mandate type in the relationship between representative and represented;
  • Implications of mandate type in political satisfaction and accountability;
  • Implications of mandate type in the raise of populist phenomena;
  • Enhancement of interconnection between representative and represented through e-democracy;
  • Mandate type and ideological position;
  • Relation between mandate type and party system;
  • Relation between mandate type and party organisation;
  • Relation between mandate type and social activism;
  • Relation between mandate type and infrastructures;
  • Mandate types in different world regions;
  • Mandate types and social movements.

Call for paper and panel proposals for Oslo 2017

Dear Colleagues,

This is a call for panel and paper proposals for the Oslo meeting September 6-9, 2017. Our Standing Groups has been allotted just five panels, the same number as for the Prague meeting. (We requested eight.). Several of you have already submitted tentative proposals and we encourage you to firm them up and resubmit them well before the official deadline of February 15. We have also received a few paper proposals. Completed panel proposals will need a good descriptive abstract plus the titles and authors names (with authors commitments to present their papers in Oslo) for four or five papers. Panel and paper proposal guidelines and procedures can be found on the ECPR website. Your Standing Group membership via MyECPR will need to be up to date.

This call to submit paper and panel proposals is open to all members of the Standing Group. If we end up with more than five solid proposals, we will petition the ECPR Academic Convenors for an additional panel or two. There is no guarantee that such a petition will be successful but the Convenors are open to considering such proposals. (The numbers of panels is partially constrained by the available rooms at the meeting site.). In addition, the Oslo meeting will include an Open Section set of panels so if by chance your proposal does not make it into the Political Sociology Section we can try to get it included in the Open Section. The same is true for proposed papers.

Below you will find a description of the Standing Group overall theme for the Oslo meeting. This has been approved by ECPR and panel and paper proposals will need to intersect in meaningful ways with the section theme.

Finally a reminder to renew your Section membership via My ECPR if you have not already done so.

Any questions or concerns, just email us.

Happy New Year 2017

Chair. Niilo Kauppi, University of Jyväskylä, niilo.t.j.kauppi[at]jyu.fi
Co-chair: David Swartz, Boston University, dswartz[at]bu.edu

WELFARE STATES IN CRISIS: CHALLENGES TO SOCIAL SOLIDARITY AND GOVERNANCE

In recent years the European welfare state has come under several challenges: economically, socially, politically, and culturally. The recent migrant crisis, for one, is challenging numerous countries in terms of social support services, security, cultural identity, and legal provision. Populist movements are challenging the dynamics of migrant integration and assimilation and the way political leadership is dealing with them. Are traditional ideals of solidarity being replaced by others? Assumptions of traditional welfare provision are also being challenged by the policies of neoliberalism. Do growing forms of economic inequality undermine the traditional safety nets afforded by state welfare policies? Forms of social solidarity have been a central concern of political sociology from its very inception. It is the social causes and consequences of these challenges that will be the focus of the panels for this section. It seems particularly fitting for political sociologists to examine those challenges at a conference in Oslo since the Nordic countries have often been viewed as model welfare states. Does the Nordic model or any other welfare state model seem capable of addressing the contemporary challenges? Other challenges target the public sphere and debate, educational reform, governance driven by rankings and technocratic indicators, social movements, law, and gender. Panels will be organized around types of challenges welfare democracies are facing, such as the welfare crises in Eastern and Balkan countries, transnational forms of solidarity in the EU, the new legitimation crisis of political leadership, the social bases of politicisation/depoliticisation, measuring institutional competitiveness and decline, revisiting the Nordic model, and the politics of flexible solidarity.

KEYWORDS: Democracy, European Union, Governance, Migration, Welfare State, Solidarity

ECPR Joint Session 2017: « The interrelated effects of social movements outcomes »

In the context of the ECPR JOINT SESSION, that will take place on April 25-30, 2017, at the University of Nottingham in the UK, a workshop titled “The interrelated effects of social movements outcomes” will be organized.

Abstract:

This workshop aims to explore innovative ways of thinking about the effects of social movements. In particular, it looks at how different types of effects relate to each other. In doing this we suggest to shift the focus from single outcomes to processes of social change generated by the interaction between different types of effects. The workshop will address the following questions: How do different types of effects of social movements relate to each other? What are the processes and mechanisms underlying the interrelations between different types of effects or between the same type of effect over time? Under what conditions does each process and mechanism work, fail to occur, or even reverse? Are some processes and mechanisms more frequently observed than others? How do such processes and mechanisms vary across different types of social movements? How should such processes and mechanisms be studied methodologically? Reflecting on how different types of outcomes interact promises to open up the path towards new ways of conceptualizing and analysing the consequences of social movements. We believe that the interrelated effects agenda can draw participants from different sub-disciplines and stimulate interdisciplinary exchange. In particular, we hope to bring together scholars working on public policies, public opinion and contentious politics, three fields that have long remained separate. The workshop welcomes papers addressing three main issues: (1) conceptual and theoretical thinking about how the effects of social movements influence each other; (2) methodological reflections about the study of the interrelated effects of social movements and how to avoid the obstacles that have hindered previous research, from both a quantitative and a qualitative perspective; (3) empirical analyses of different types of social movements, whether in-depth cases studies or comparative analyses encompassing different types of conflicts and/or countries. Submissions will be evaluated according to quality, specific fit with the overall theme of the workshop, and potential for reaching a wider audience.

(https://ecpr.eu/Events/PanelDetails.aspx?PanelID=4838&EventID=104)

The ECPR’s Joint Sessions of Workshops have a unique format that makes them a leading forum for substantive discussion and collaboration between scholars of political science. They are now recognised as one of the major highlights of the world’s political science calendar. In 2017, the Joint Sessions will take place at the University of Nottingham in the UK.

Workshops are closed gatherings of 15-20 participants, which last for about five days, bringing together scholars from across the world and all career stages. Topics of discussion are precisely defined, and only scholars currently working in the Workshop’s field, and with a Paper or research document for discussion, are invited to participate. Participants may attend only one Workshop, and must stay for the duration of the event. This format ensures intensive collaboration which often results not only in thorough critiques of the new research being presented, but in new research groups being formed to take that work forward.

You will be able to submit your Paper proposal (Paper abstract) via MyECPR between 1 August and 1 December 2016. Please ensure that your personal and institutional details are correct in your MyECPR account. Should you have any queries please contact the Events Team at ECPR Central Services for assistance.

Paper proposals should be submitted by 1 December 2016 via MyECPR. Workshop Directors will be able to access all submitted proposals and you will be notified of their decision by mid-January. Papers sent directly to the Workshop Directors will not be considered.

The deadline for all abstract submissions is December 1st, 2016.

Looking forward for your abstracts,

Lorenzo Bosi and Marco Giugni

Workshop directors